• Hans was Heiri, Zimmermann & de Perrot.
  • Hans was Heiri, Zimmermann & de Perrot.
  • Hans was Heiri, Zimmermann & de Perrot.

28 October 2013 / , , ,

Wonderfully erie, funny, outlandish, and mesmerizing Hans was Heiri by Zimmermann & de Perrot is part theatre, part performance, part circus all set to dreamlike downtempo house music played live. If not already awesome, the main stage prop is a rotating four room diorama fitted with furniture and filled with performers tumbling gracefully from floor to wall, wall to ceiling, and back again with acrobatic delight. It’s as much childlike as it is lunacy, as performers interact with each other intimately in an incoherent language of gestures and sounds. What’s really striking however is the ease, fluidity, and grace in which our seven performers move around and interact with the space—dazzling with each move they make. Hans was Heiri is a brilliant visual and physical take on relationships and human nature, check out BAM’s site where it was performed and view Zimmermann & de Perrot’s site for even more info.

  • 2666, Roberto Bolaño.

26 October 2013 / ,

Hand-in-hand, guided, shown, pointed to where you should draw your attention, you ask questions but receive no answers, there are no answers, you need no answers. Landing, you catch your breath and look around, everything is vivid, this is life, always thinking in the future you wonder what will happen next… then bam, you’ve landed in another place, just as vivid as the place before, but much different, you become engrossed in this new place, but it happens again… you’ve moved again. Bolaño easily engrosses you in each five parts of his epic novel 2666. 2666 truly gives you a sense of life—a steady movement of events, momentum into oblivion. Suspense and mystery slowly build throughout each part, all concluding in the city of Santa Teresa (based on Ciudad Juárez), the Mexican border-town whose claim to fame is low unemployment… and the serial killings of women. This siren city draws people from all walks of life and from all over the world, each trying to digest (and answer) how exactly these incomprehensible crimes are possible. And so our protagonists converge: literary scholars from Europe in search of a rouge writer, a relocated professor from Barcelona, a reporter from New York, detectives and a senator in search of answers, and finally the rogue writer Archimboldi himself, but will their questions ever be answered? Only the slow momentum of life will tell. Bolaño’s goliath masterpiece 2666 gropes around in literary darkness, setting the tone for contemporary literature to come. Get it yourself here.

  • The Blue Dragon, Robert Lepage.

27 September 2013 / ,

This past Saturday (September 21) I was lucky enough to catch the final performance of “The Blue Dragon” by Robert Lepage, the said final third part of his “Dragon” trilogy. I know nothing about the previous two prequels, which is fine, because “The Blue Dragon” holds its own in every sense. “The Blue Dragon” is very much a cinematic experience, but better, because the actors are actually in front of you and everything happening on stage is in front of you, making the experience richer, more human, allowing yourself to connect to the characters in a way the screen cannot. Set in Shanghai, the plot is centered around Pierre, a gallery owner, his star artist and lover Xiao, and his x-wife Claire who’s come to adopt a child. This complicated love triangle moves through beautifully made sets lit perfectly and accented by subtle details that give life to the performance. The climax is a cleverly crafted end to the trios woes—almost anticlimactic—giving the audience an ending(s) that is both satisfying and real. “The Blue Dragon” gives theater an addictive quality and has made me excited for more, check out BAMs page on “The Blue Dragon” here.

  • Paul Klee
  • Paul Klee
  • Paul Klee
  • Paul Klee

16 August 2013 / ,

As a huge bauhaus fan I’m naturally obsessed with Paul Klee and his expressive, childlike, and haunting art works. Luckily MoMA is releasing a limited edition book containing 40 prints of various etchings, drawings, and illustrations dating from 1903–1931. A little above my price range at $450 but well worth a look, you can download a PDF of the entire series on their site here. Many of these prints portray a side of Klee I wasn’t too familiar with, showcasing much of his earlier work, a fascinating collection of abstract and mutated figures and shapes.

01 August 2013 / ,

More and more in my design-blog feed I see that some designer has re-imagined an existing design or product. Yes, vaguely interesting and amusing, but why? Why do they do it? I’m assuming they love the product, site, or service; but is the best way to get their attention by redesigning their already good (usually great) design? I think not. And as the trend grows I can only think about what original and more provoking designs these designers could be creating in their time instead. The one thing time will tell is that originality trumps flattery and that there’s a lot more a designer can give to the world than a copy of a copy. So with that in mind I leave you with what Instagram for iOS 7 looks like in this designers head, here.