• Derek Cianfrance: Hacking Life: Using Creativity To Break Into The System

12 April 2013 / , ,

I came to AIGAs latest installment of “hacking life” ignorant. Derek Cianfrance was speaking and I hadn’t seen Blue Valentine nor had I heard about The Place Beyond the Pines…but I left a Cianfrance addict (and watched Blue Valentine that night). All Derek had done was talk about himself, which I love, not in an arrogant sense but in an insightful here-is-my-journey sort of way. Being completely transparent and incredibly sure of himself he described his process in film, his struggles, and how not getting what he wanted right away always paid-off in the end. He said that his period doing documentaries humbled him and gave him a new perspective on film and how to film—trusting more in his actors and allowing for spontaneity. Now thoroughly smitten, inspired, and mildly obsessed, I’m required to see The Place Beyond the Pines which is sure not to disappoint. Check out more about the event at http://aigany.org/events/hacking-life-using-creativity-to-break-into-the-system-series/.

  • Japanese Matchbox Labels 1920–1940.
  • Japanese Matchbox Labels 1920–1940.
  • Japanese Matchbox Labels 1920–1940.
  • Japanese Matchbox Labels 1920–1940.

08 April 2013 / ,

Is it possible, that of all things, matchboxes could be beautifully and originally labeled and decorated? Yes, if you were Japanese in the 1920s–40s that is. Fortunately, we can strike a glimpse of that nostalgic beauty in this collection of Japanese matchbox labels. And beauty doesn’t fully describe these works of art, each is vibrantly colored and styled in the turn-of-the-century flat illustration style that I love so much. Refreshingly experimental in nature, these labels make the ordinary extraordinary; using directionality, type, and color to transcribe their message. It’s best to look at these as what they are: art infused into ordinary life, and the choice of substance and style over noise. See more at http://www.flickr.com/photos/maraid/sets/72157604922299315/.

  • Javier Garcia for Herb Lester Associates, Barcelona at Ease, 2012.
  • Javier Garcia for Herb Lester Associates, Barcelona at Ease, 2012.
  • Javier Garcia for Herb Lester Associates, Barcelona at Ease, 2012.

05 April 2013 / ,

For any lover of maps, or travel, or Barcelona…well this guide is for you. This short-and-sweet guide depicts the historical center of Barcelona, highlighting the equivocal necessities for your time in Barcelona (or on your couch). And for someone seeing this guide post trip to Barcelona, it’s a great way to stir-up nostalgic thoughts and comment on the beautiful design of the map. If Barcelona isn’t enough, Herb Lester produces a range of city guides sure to cure your itch—this one’s designed and illustrated by Javier Garcia. Get your own at http://www.herblester.com/collections/all/products/barcelona-at-ease.

  • AIGA's In-The-House III: The Rise of In-House Design.

02 April 2013 / ,

Last Thursday night AIGA hosted the much anticipated (for me anyways) In-The-House III: The Rise of In-House-Design lecture series at Parsons, featuring in-house greats such as Johanna Langford of J. Crew, Julia Hoffmann of the MoMA, and Ji Lee of Facebook; moderated by Debbie Millman. Ji Lee was a personal favorite for the night, truly opening himself up to reveal his doubts and struggles, as well as shedding light into the interesting and inspirational corporate culture at Facebook. Not to leave anyone else out, Johanna Langford boasted her fantastic work at J. Crew—a clean, bright, and bold style—but at times sounding too salesy. Julia Hoffmann of the MoMA let her team take the stage as they presented some jaw-dropping work that made me truly jealous of the art-filled environment they work in. It was a proud and inspirational night for in-house designers alike, follow up at http://aigany.org/events/in-the-house-iii-the-rise-of-in-house-design-presented-by-parsons-lecture-series/.

  • Henri Labrouste, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, 1854. Photo by Candida Höferj.
  • Henri Labrouste, 1841.
  • Henri Labrouste
  • Hector Horeau, 1866.

30 March 2013 / ,

After viewing this exhibition a part of me wants to be an architect. There’s something romantic in the notion of elaborately and meticulously drawing the details and perspectives of grand spaces in grand proportion. Henri Labrouste was that romantic, and the exhibition is the MoMA’s Henri Labrouste: Structure Brought to Light, a thorough and “library” organized exhibition featuring drawings, models, and photos from Labrouste and other influential architects. My focus wandering through the show were the intricate drawings and old photos from buildings still standing and long gone. I’m struck by the amount of patience and focus Labrouste and others must have had creating their masterpieces, as no stone is left unturned and every detail is accounted for. The exhibition left me a bit restless, wanting to explore and document these buildings myself, to experience first-hand the passion of another. See it now through June 24. http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1319.